“Some Experiences of an Irish R.M.” by Somerville and Ross

$100.00

Irish Fiction

Explore the social dynamics between the Anglo-Irish landlord class and their Catholic tenants through a comic lens by reading and discussing The Irish R.M. stories. They are “among the most popular and successful works of comic fiction to have come out of Ireland.” 

Course text: Some Experiences of an Irish R.M. by Somerville and Ross.

4 Zoom Sessions. Thursdays 6:30 – 7:45 pm. November 3 through December 1. No class on November 24th.

Course fee: $100

  • Online payment is strongly preferred. It automatically notifies the instructor and the director of the Irish College of your registration.
  • By check, make it out to ‘Celtic Junction Arts Center’ and mail to Irish College, Celtic Junction Arts Center, 836 Prior Ave N, St. Paul, MN 55104. If you pay by check, please send an email to the instructor, Mary McCormick at mary@mccormickintl.com and copy education@celticjunction.org. Without an email, we won’t know to expect you or how to communicate with you.
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Description

The Irish R.M. stories “have been among the most popular and successful works of comic fiction to have come out of Ireland.”  Some Experiences of an Irish R.M., published in 1899, was the first of a series of three comic novels.  The stories were made into a British TV series, The Irish R.M. (1983-85), shown on Masterpiece Theatre. Following the spirit and satirical tradition of Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent (1800), the subject is the fish-out-of-water life of an Anglo-Irish former British Army officer recently appointed as a resident magistrate (R.M.) in pre-independence West Ireland. “As the straight man narrator, observer, and regular butt of hundreds of hilarious trials and mishaps, Major Yeates never ceases to be surprised, is usually not amused, and can’t stop himself from loving his Irish neighbors.” — 500 Great Books by Women. Edith Somerville and Martin Ross (pen name for Violet Florence Martin) were second cousins born to distant branches of a prominent Anglo-Irish Ascendancy family.  They lived together at the Somerville home for most of their adult lives, traveling frequently to Europe and collaborating on numerous books and articles. Join us in exploring the social dynamics between the Anglo-Irish landlord class and their Catholic tenants through a comic lens.