Irish Mystic A.E. (George Russell)

$100.00

Introduction to Irish Spiritual Masters

Famous Irish mystic, poet, painter, dramatist, editor, and conversationalist, A.E., the pseudonym of George Russell (1867-1935) was an inspirational friend and mentor to three generations of Irish poets and writers including W.B. Yeats, George Moore, Patrick Kavanagh, and Frank O’Connor. His political and social writings provided further inspiration to international figures such as Mahatma Gandhi and, in his last years, he was a trusted advisor to the Roosevelt administration in the U.S.

Course text: A.E (George Russell), The Candle of Vision (1918) [Any paperback edition].

4 Zoom sessions. Tuesdays. 6:30 -7:45 pm. October 4 – 25.  

Class fee: $100

  • Online payment is strongly preferred. It automatically notifies the instructor and the director of the Irish College of your registration.
  • By check, make it out to ‘Celtic Junction Arts Center’ and mail to Irish College, Celtic Junction Arts Center, 836 Prior Ave N, St. Paul, MN 55104.  If you pay by check, please send an email to the instructor, Dr. Patrick O’Donnell at education@celticjunction.orgWithout an email, we won’t know to expect you or how to communicate with you. 
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Description

The famous mystic, poet, painter, dramatist, editor, and conversationalist, A.E., the pseudonym of George Russell (1867-1935) was known for his luminous goodness and infinite kindness. He was the core inspirational catalyst energizing the Irish Literary Renaissance, usually dated from approximately 1890-1940. In this class, you will discover the extraordinary story and influence of this great figure. He left his native Lurgan in Co. Armagh to move with his family to Dublin at the age of 11 and once there he grew into a visionary and a master of esoteric knowledge and “creative visualization” through his study of Theosophy, American Transcendentalism, and the world’s religions. He then became a practical mystic through his decades-long committed involvement with the agricultural cooperative movement, espousing self-reliance to Ireland’s farmers. He was an inspirational friend and mentor to three generations of Irish poets and writers including W.B. Yeats, George Moore, Patrick Kavanagh, and Frank O’Connor. His political and social writings provided further inspiration to international figures such as Mahatma Gandhi and, in his last years, he was a trusted advisor to the Roosevelt administration in the U.S.