The Irish Diaspora: Emigration and Exile

$150.00

In this course, we’ll take a look at the range of the Irish experience of emigration and immigration, including the medieval-era monasteries in continental Europe founded by Irish monks, the “Wild Geese” who joined Continental armies in Europe, the migrations to the New World, and more. 

6 Zoom Sessions. Wednesdays 8 – 9:15 pm. October 12 through November 16.

Course fee: $150

  • Online payment is strongly preferred. It automatically notifies the instructor and the director of the Irish College of your registration.
  • By check, make it out to ‘Celtic Junction Arts Center’ and mail to Irish College, Celtic Junction Arts Center, 836 Prior Ave N, St. Paul, MN 55104. If you pay by check, please send an email to instructors, Noreen Bowden at noreenbowden@gmail.com and Regina Driscoll at rmdriscoll@mac.com. Copy education@celticjunction.org. Without an email, we won’t know to expect you or how to communicate with you.

Description

When we think of Irish emigration, we often think of Famine-era emigrants trudging to coffin ships to sail to North America. But the Irish tradition of emigration spans centuries and the globe. In this course, we’ll take a look at the range of the Irish experience of emigration and immigration, including the medieval-era monasteries in continental Europe founded by Irish monks, the “Wild Geese” who joined Continental armies in Europe, the migrations to the New World, and more. We’ll examine the Irish-American experience, exploring some of the differences between Irish who settled in the South, the mid-Atlantic States, New England, and the West, as well as the experience of the Irish in Minnesota. We’ll also examine the nature of the Irish-American psyche, examining the Irish character and the legacy that emigrants brought from home: family structure, community expectations, the role of the church, alcohol, shame, and the effects of colonization. We’ll discuss the role of this legacy as it has been passed down through generations. Finally, we’ll look at creative cultural artifacts of emigration and diaspora, including painting, public monuments, oral histories, and more, and explore what the Irish diaspora means today.